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κβ Cet (Tiānqūnèr)



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Elemental abundances in the atmosphere of clump giants
Aims.The aim of this paper is to provide the fundamental parameters andabundances for a large sample of local clump giants with a highaccuracy. This study is a part of a big project, in which the verticaldistribution of the stars in the Galactic disc and the chemical anddynamical evolution of the Galaxy are being investigated. Methods:.The selection of clump stars for the sample group was made applying acolour-absolute magnitude window to nearby Hipparcos stars. Theeffective temperatures were estimated by the line depth ratio method.The surface gravities (log {g}) were determined by two methods (thefirst one was the method based on the ionization balance of iron and thesecond one was the method based on fitting of the wings of the Ca I6162.17 Å line). The abundances of carbon and nitrogen wereobtained from the molecular synthetic spectrum, and the Mg and Naabundances were derived using the non-LTE approximation. The "classical"models of stellar evolution without atomic diffusion androtation-induced mixing were employed. Results: .The atmosphericparameters ({T_eff}, log {g}, [Fe/H], {Vt}) and Li, C, N, O,Na, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ni abundances in 177 clump giants of the Galacticdisc were determined. The underabundance of carbon, overabundance ofnitrogen, and "normal" abundance of oxygen were detected. A small sodiumoverabundance was found. A possibility of a selection of the clumpgiants based on their chemical composition and the evolutionary trackswas explored. Conclusions: .The theoretical predictions based onthe classical stellar evolution models are in good agreement with theobserved surface variations of the carbon and nitrogen just after thefirst dredge-up episode. The giants show the same behaviour of thedependencies of O, Mg, Ca, and Si (α-elements) and Ni (iron-peakelement) abundances vs. [Fe/H] as dwarfs do. This allows us to use suchabundance ratios to study the chemical and dynamical evolution of theGalaxy.

Stellar Parameters and Photospheric Abundances of Late-G Giants: Properties of the Targets of the Okayama Planet Search Program
Towards clarifying the properties of late-G giants, for which we arecurrently conducting a planet-search project at Okayama AstrophysicalObservatory, an extensive spectroscopic study has been performed for ourfirst target sample of fifty-seven G6-G9 III stars, in order toestablish the atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g,vt, and [Fe/H]), the stellar mass along with the evolutionarystatus, and the photospheric abundances of various elements. It wasconfirmed that the conventional spectroscopic method of parameterdetermination using Fe I / II lines with the assumption of LTE workssuccessfully for these evolved stars. We determined the abundances(relative to the Sun) of 19 elements, and examined how their [X/Fe]ratios behave themselves with the run of [Fe/H]. While the trends appearto be similar to those exhibited by disk dwarfs for a number ofelements, some elements (C, O, Na) showed appreciable anomalies, whichmay be interpreted as being due to a dredge-up of nuclear-processedmaterial. Since the [Fe/H] values of these stars tend to be somewhatbiased towards a subsolar regime, some mechanism of slightly reducingthe metallicity might be suspected.

Radial-Velocity Variability of G-Type Giants: First Three Years of the Okayama Planet Search Program
We report on the radial-velocity variability of G-type giants based onthe results of precise Doppler measurements of 57 stars that wereobserved for the first 3 years of the Okayama Planet Search Program.This program aims to search for planets around intermediate-mass starsin their evolved stages as late-G giants. We found that most of thetargets with B ‑ V < 1.0 have radial-velocity scatters ofσ ˜ 10 m s-1, with the most stable reaching levels of6‑8 m s-1, while those with B ‑ V > 1.0 typically showσ ˜ 20 m s-1. In total, about 60% of the targets are stable inradial velocity to a level of σ < 15 m s-1 over 1-3 years, andabout 90% have σ < 30 m s-1. We found that 4 stars (HD 30557,HD 34559, HD 68077, and HD 85444) show significant long-termradial-velocity trends, suggesting that they are probably orbited byunseen stellar or substellar companions. Three stars (HD 79181, HD104985, and HD 141680) show periodic radial-velocity variations. HD104985 is the first planet-harboring star discovered from our survey.The properties of the variations in these 3 stars have been, and willbe, extensively discussed in separate papers. Relatively large, but notapparently periodic, radial-velocity variations of σ > 30 m s-1are found in 4 stars (HD 41597, HD 134190, HD 161178, and HD 176598).For most of the stars without showing any significant periodicity, wecan exclude companions with K > 50 m s-1, or m2sini > 1.8 MJ (a/AU)1/2(M*/Mȯ)1/2 for orbital radii a ≲ 1‑2 AU.

A catalog of bright calibrator stars for 200-m baseline near-infrared stellar interferometry
We present in this paper a catalog of reference stars suitable forcalibrating infrared interferometric observations. In the K band,visibilities can be calibrated with a precision of 1% on baselines up to200 meters for the whole sky, and up to 300 meters for some part of thesky. This work, extending to longer baselines a previous catalogcompiled by Bordé et al. (2002, A&A, 393, 183), isparticularl y well adapted to hectometric-class interferometers such asthe Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI, Glindemann et al. 2003,Proc. SPIE, 4838, 89) or the CHARA array (ten Brummelaar et al. 2003,Proc. SPIE, 4838, 69) when one is observing well-resolved, high-surfacebrightness objects (K  8). We use the absolute spectro-photometriccalibration method introduced by Cohen et al. (1999, AJ, 117, 1864) toderive the angular diameters of our new set of 948 G8-M0 calibratorstars extracted from the IRAS, 2MASS and MSX catalogs. Angular stellardiameters range from 0.6 mas to 1.8 mas (median is 1.1 mas) with amedian precision of 1.35%. For both the northern and southernhemispheres, the closest calibrator star is always less than 10°away.

CHARM2: An updated Catalog of High Angular Resolution Measurements
We present an update of the Catalog of High Angular ResolutionMeasurements (CHARM, Richichi & Percheron \cite{CHARM}, A&A,386, 492), which includes results available until July 2004. CHARM2 is acompilation of direct measurements by high angular resolution methods,as well as indirect estimates of stellar diameters. Its main goal is toprovide a reference list of sources which can be used for calibrationand verification observations with long-baseline optical and near-IRinterferometers. Single and binary stars are included, as are complexobjects from circumstellar shells to extragalactic sources. The presentupdate provides an increase of almost a factor of two over the previousedition. Additionally, it includes several corrections and improvements,as well as a cross-check with the valuable public release observationsof the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). A total of 8231entries for 3238 unique sources are now present in CHARM2. Thisrepresents an increase of a factor of 3.4 and 2.0, respectively, overthe contents of the previous version of CHARM.The catalog is only available in electronic form at the CDS viaanonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr ( or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/431/773

Magnetic activity of six young solar analogues I. Starspot cycles from long-term photometry
A long-term photometric monitoring of a selected sample of solaranalogues has been carried out since early nineties as part of The Sunin time project, which is aimed at a multiwavelength study of stars withsolar-like global properties, but with different ages and thus atdifferent stages of their evolution. The extended time sequence ofground-based observations collected over more than a decade as part ofthis program has revealed the existence of starspot cycles. Also fromthese data it is possible to investigate surface differential rotationof the stars. In this paper we present the photometry collected to dateand report on cycles search for a selected subsample of five youngsingle G0-G5V stars with ages between =~ 130 Myr and 700 Myr:EK Dra, pi 1 UMa, HNPeg, k1 Cet and BE Cet.Also we include in this study the Pleiades-age ( =~ 130 Myr) K0V starDX Leo (HD 82443). All the cited stars show activitycycles whose period is, furthermore, the first determined fromphotometric data. They are compared to those activity cycles derivedfrom CaII H&K emission fluxes and differences are discussed. All thecycle periods, except for EK Dra, fit well the empirical relations withglobal stellar parameters derived from larger stellar samples. Thefollowing results are also inferred from the present study: i) thefastest rotating stars tend to have longer cycles; ii) the range in theobserved cycle lengths seems to converge with stellar age from a maximumdispersion around the Pleiades' age towards the solar cycle value at theSun's age; iii) the overall short- and long-term photometric variabilityincreases with inverse Rossby number with very high correlation degree,indicating that the level of magnetic activity at least in photosphereis still controlled by the stellar rotation even on the longest timescales; iiii) the increase with inverse Rossby number of the long-termoverall photometric variability seems to level off at the highestrotation rate, which may be interpreted as due to a saturation in thelevel of photospheric magnetic activity around the activity maximum.

Photometric Variability in a Sample of 187 G and K Giants
We have used three automatic photoelectric telescopes to obtainphotometric observations of 187 G, K, and (a few) M0 field giants. Wefind low-amplitude photometric variability on timescales of days toweeks on both sides of the coronal dividing line (CDL) in a total of 81or 43% of the 187 giants. About one-third of the variables haveamplitudes greater than 0.01 mag in V. In our sample the percentage ofvariable giants is a minimum for late-G spectral classes and increasesfor earlier and later classes; all K5 and M0 giants are variable. Wealso obtained high-resolution, red wavelength spectroscopic observationsof 147 of the giants, which we used to determine spectralclassifications, vsini values, and radial velocities. We acquiredadditional high-resolution, blue wavelength spectra of 48 of the giants,which we used to determine chromospheric emission fluxes. We analyzedthe photometric and spectroscopic observations to identify the cause(s)of photometric variability in our sample of giants. We show that thelight variations in the vast majority of G and K giant variables cannotbe due to rotation. For giants on the cool side of the CDL, we find thatthe variability mechanism is radial pulsation. Thus, the variabilitymechanism operating in M giants extends into the K giants up to aboutspectral class K2. On the hot side of the CDL, the variability mechanismis most likely nonradial, g-mode pulsation.

Moderate-Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Cool Stars: A New K-Band Library
I present an atlas of near-infrared K-band spectra of 31 late-typegiants and supergiants and two carbon stars. The spectra were obtainedat resolving powers of 830 and 2000, and have a signal-to-noise ratio>~100. These data are complemented with results from similar existinglibraries in both K and H band, and they are used to identify varioustools useful for stellar population studies at moderate resolution. Ifocus on several of the most prominent absorption features and (1)investigate the effects of spectral resolution on measurements of theirequivalent width (EW), (2) examine the variations with stellarparameters of the EWs, and (3) construct composite indices as indicatorsof stellar parameters and of the contribution from excess continuumsources commonly found in star-forming and AGN galaxies. Among thefeatures considered, the 12CO (2,0) and 12CO (6,3)bandheads together with the Si I 1.59 μm feature, first proposed byOliva, Origlia, and coworkers, constitute the best diagnostic set forstellar spectral classification and for constraining the excesscontinuum emission. The Ca I 2.26 μm and Mg I 2.28 μm featuresoffer alternatives in the K band to the 12CO (6,3) bandheadand Si I feature.

The photoelectric astrolabe catalogue of Yunnan Observatory (YPAC).
The positions of 53 FK5, 70 FK5 Extension and 486 GC stars are given forthe equator and equinox J2000.0 and for the mean observation epoch ofeach star. They are determined with the photoelectric astrolabe ofYunnan Observatory. The internal mean errors in right ascension anddeclination are +/- 0.046" and +/- 0.059", respectively. The meanobservation epoch is 1989.51.

Rotation of solar-like main sequence stars.
The results of the photometric survey of 16 solar-type, active, fieldstars are presented. During our observations 9 stars showed appreciablelight variability with amplitudes of a few hundredths of a magnitude butfor three of them periods could not be determined. Most of the observedvariable stars have periods shorter than about 10 days. It is suggestedthat, similarly as is observed in the Hyades cluster, small amplitudelight variations are quite common among active field solar-type dwarfswith rotation periods around one week or less. A strong modulation ofamplitude of some variable stars over the time scale of years isdemonstrated. The amplitude may sometimes decrease even below thedetectability threshold. A special case is HD 17576 - a visual binaryconsisting of a G0 dwarf and a much fainter hot subdwarf. It has thelargest amplitude of all the stars observed, which suggests an intensespot activity, a very strong H and K line core emission and a very highX-ray emission flux, close to the saturation limit. Yet its variabilityperiod is equal to 18.74 days - almost an order of magnitude longer thanexpected for such an active dwarf.

Vitesses radiales. Catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten. Subtittle: Radial velocities: The Wilson-Evans-Batten catalogue.
We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocitiesby Wilson (1963) and Evans (1978) to which we have added the catalogueof spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989). For each star,when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set ofIdentifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data) ofthe CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the numberHIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992). 3) the CCDM number(Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) byDommanget & Nys (1994). For the cluster stars, a precise study hasbeen done, on the identificator numbers. Numerous remarks point out theproblems we have had to deal with.

Evolved GK stars near the Sun. 2: The young disk population
From a sample of nearly 2000 GK giants a group of young disk stars withwell determined space motions has been selected. The zero point of theluminosity calibrations, both from the ultraviolet flux (modifiedStroemgren system) and that in the region of 4200 to 4900 A (DDOsystem), show a discontinuity of about a half magnitude at the border ofthe young disk and old disk domains. The population separation is basedon the space velocity components, which are also an age discriminant,with the population interface near 2 x 109 yr, based onmodels with convective overshoot at the core. This age corresponds togiant masses near 1.7 solar mass, near the critical mass separating theyoung stars that do not burn helium in degenerate cores from older starsthat do. Ten percent of both populations show CN anomalies in that thederived value of P(Fe/H) from CN (Cm) and fromFe(M1) differ by more than 0.1 dex and the weak and strong CNstars occur equally in the old disk but the weak CN stars predominate inthe young disk. Peculiar stars, where flux distortions affect theluminosity calibrations, are of the CH+(Ba II) and CH-(weak G band)variety and represent less than 1% of the stars in both populations. Theyoung disk giants are restricted to ages greater than about109 yr, because younger stars are bright giants orsupergiants (luminosity class 2 or 1), and younger than about 2 x109 yr, because the old disk-young disk boundary occurs near1.7 solar mass. The distribution of heavy element abundances, P(Fe/H),for young disk giants is both more limited in range (+/- 0.4 dex) and isskewed toward higher abundances, compared with the nearly normaldistribution for old disk giants. The distribution of (U,V) velocityvectors gives (U,V,W) and their dispersions = (+17.6 +/- 18.4, -14.8 +/-8.4, -6.9 +/- 13.0) and (+3.6 +/- 38.4, -20.7 +/- 27.5, -6.7 +/-17.3)km/s for young and old disk giants, respectively.

Einstein Observatory magnitude-limited X-ray survey of late-type giant and supergiant stars
Results are presented of an extensive X-ray survey of 380 giant andsupergiant stars of spectral types from F to M, carried out with theEinstein Observatory. It was found that the observed F giants orsubgiants (slightly evolved stars with a mass M less than about 2 solarmasses) are X-ray emitters at the same level of main-sequence stars ofsimilar spectral type. The G giants show a range of emissions more than3 orders of magnitude wide; some single G giants exist with X-rayluminosities comparable to RS CVn systems, while some nearby large Ggiants have upper limits on the X-ray emission below typical solarvalues. The K giants have an observed X-ray emission level significantlylower than F and F giants. None of the 29 M giants were detected, exceptfor one spectroscopic binary.

Large and Kinematically Unbiased Samples of G- and K-Type Stars. III. Evolved Young Disk Stars in the Bright Star Sample
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1989PASP..101...54E&db_key=AST

Large and kinematically unbiased samples of G- and K-type stars. II - Observations of evolved stars in the Bright Star sample. III - Evolved young disk stars in the Bright Star sample
Four color and RI observations were obtained for a large sample ofG-type and K-type stars in the Bright Star Catalogue. Data are firstpresented for 110 evolved stars. Photometry of evolved young diskpopulation stars have then been calibrated for luminosity, reddening,and metallicity on the basis of results for members of the Hyades andSirius superclusters. New DDO results are given for 120 stars.

A list of MK standard stars
Not Available

The Perkins catalog of revised MK types for the cooler stars
A catalog is presented listing the spectral types of the G, K, M, and Sstars that have been classified at the Perkins Observatory in therevised MK system. Extensive comparisons have been made to ensureconsistency between the MK spectral types of stars in the Northern andSouthern Hemispheres. Different classification spectrograms have beengradually improved in spite of some inherent limitations. In thecatalog, the full subclasses used are the following: G0, G5, G8, K0, K1,K2, K3, K4, K5, M0, M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, and M8. Theirregularities are the price paid for keeping the general scheme of theoriginal Henry Draper classification.

1988 Revised MK Spectral Standards for Stars GO and Later
Not Available

Photometric variability in chromospherically active stars. I - The constant stars
Over 3800 differential UBV observations for 15 known or suspectedchromospherically active stars are presented. The precision of thephotometry is evaluated. None of the stars exhibited light variationsover the observational period 1983 through 1987.

Narrow-band photometry of late-type stars. II
This paper presents extensive narrow-band photometry in the Uppsalasystem supplementing earlier published mesurements so that data now areavailable for all late-type stars brighter than V = 6.05 and a number ofgalactic cluster members. Numerous UBV and BV measurements are alsopublished. The data are used to determine relations for the predictionof UBV intrinsic colors for late-type stars from the narrow-bandmeasurements. The main purpose of the data is to constitute the basisfor the determination of solar-neighborhood space densities of late-typestars, mainly giants of different kinds; these space densities will becombined with narrow-band data for fainter stars in the north Galacticpole region to yield the decrease of space density with distance fromthe galactic plane for many kinds of late-type stars.

E. W. Fick Observatory stellar radial velocity measurements. I - 1976-1984
Stellar radial velocity observations made with the large vacuumhigh-dispersion photoelectric radial velocity spectrometer at FickObservatory are reported. This includes nearly 2000 late-type starsobserved during 585 nights. Gradual modifications to this instrumentover its first eight years of operation have reduced the observationalerror for high-quality dip observations to + or - 0.8 km/s.

1985 revised MK spectral standards : stars GO and later
Not Available

Revised MK Spectral Standard Stars Later than G0
Not Available

The absolute magnitudes of G5-M3 stars near the giant branch
The absolute magnitudes of stars on the red giant branch (G-K-M) havebeen determined using both trigonometric and statistical parallaxes,from a sample of 212 stars classified in the Revised MK System (Keenanand Pitts, 1980). The results of both methods are summarized in a table.A good agreement is found and the difference between trigonometric andstatistical parallaxes is found not to be greater than + or - 0.002. Thecomputed absolute magnitudes and space motions are tabulated.

Revised MK spectral types for G, K, and M stars
A catalog of spectral types of 552 G, K, and M stars is presented, whichis classified on the revised MK system. Stellar representatives of thehalo, disk, and arm populations in all parts of the sky are included.Photoelectric V magnitudes are given, as are intensity estimates of anyfeatures which make the spectrum appear peculiar as compared to thespectrum of a similar normal star. Abundance indices are also providedin the following lines or bands: CN, barium, Fe, calcium, and CH.

Uvby-Beta Photometry of Equatorial and Southern Bright Stars - Part Two
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1980A&AS...42..311H&db_key=AST

MK spectral types for some F and G stars.
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1979PASP...91...83C&db_key=AST

Effects of heavy-element abundance on spectroscopic luminosities of G5-K0 giants.
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1977ApJ...214..399K&db_key=AST

The OB stellar associations in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1974ApJS...28...73L&db_key=AST

MK classifications for F-and G-type stars. 3.
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1974AJ.....79..682H&db_key=AST

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Observation and Astrometry data

Right ascension:03h21m06.80s
Apparent magnitude:5.69
Distance:89.047 parsecs
Proper motion RA:56.4
Proper motion Dec:-24.1
B-T magnitude:6.902
V-T magnitude:5.787

Catalogs and designations:
Proper NamesTiānqūnèr
Bayerκβ Cet
Flamsteed97 Cet
HD 1989HD 20791
TYCHO-2 2000TYC 60-1705-1
USNO-A2.0USNO-A2 0900-00773445
BSC 1991HR 1007
HIPHIP 15619

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