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Local kinematics of K and M giants from CORAVEL/Hipparcos/Tycho-2 data. Revisiting the concept of superclusters
The availability of the Hipparcos Catalogue has triggered many kinematicand dynamical studies of the solar neighbourhood. Nevertheless, thosestudies generally lacked the third component of the space velocities,i.e., the radial velocities. This work presents the kinematic analysisof 5952 K and 739 M giants in the solar neighbourhood which includes forthe first time radial velocity data from a large survey performed withthe CORAVEL spectrovelocimeter. It also uses proper motions from theTycho-2 catalogue, which are expected to be more accurate than theHipparcos ones. An important by-product of this study is the observedfraction of only 5.7% of spectroscopic binaries among M giants ascompared to 13.7% for K giants. After excluding the binaries for whichno center-of-mass velocity could be estimated, 5311 K and 719 M giantsremain in the final sample. The UV-plane constructed from these datafor the stars with precise parallaxes (σπ/π≤20%) reveals a rich small-scale structure, with several clumpscorresponding to the Hercules stream, the Sirius moving group, and theHyades and Pleiades superclusters. A maximum-likelihood method, based ona Bayesian approach, has been applied to the data, in order to make fulluse of all the available stars (not only those with precise parallaxes)and to derive the kinematic properties of these subgroups. Isochrones inthe Hertzsprung-Russell diagram reveal a very wide range of ages forstars belonging to these groups. These groups are most probably relatedto the dynamical perturbation by transient spiral waves (as recentlymodelled by De Simone et al. \cite{Simone2004}) rather than to clusterremnants. A possible explanation for the presence of younggroup/clusters in the same area of the UV-plane is that they have beenput there by the spiral wave associated with their formation, while thekinematics of the older stars of our sample has also been disturbed bythe same wave. The emerging picture is thus one of dynamical streamspervading the solar neighbourhood and travelling in the Galaxy withsimilar space velocities. The term dynamical stream is more appropriatethan the traditional term supercluster since it involves stars ofdifferent ages, not born at the same place nor at the same time. Theposition of those streams in the UV-plane is responsible for the vertexdeviation of 16.2o ± 5.6o for the wholesample. Our study suggests that the vertex deviation for youngerpopulations could have the same dynamical origin. The underlyingvelocity ellipsoid, extracted by the maximum-likelihood method afterremoval of the streams, is not centered on the value commonly acceptedfor the radial antisolar motion: it is centered on < U > =-2.78±1.07 km s-1. However, the full data set(including the various streams) does yield the usual value for theradial solar motion, when properly accounting for the biases inherent tothis kind of analysis (namely, < U > = -10.25±0.15 kms-1). This discrepancy clearly raises the essential questionof how to derive the solar motion in the presence of dynamicalperturbations altering the kinematics of the solar neighbourhood: doesthere exist in the solar neighbourhood a subset of stars having no netradial motion which can be used as a reference against which to measurethe solar motion?Based on observations performed at the Swiss 1m-telescope at OHP,France, and on data from the ESA Hipparcos astrometry satellite.Full Table \ref{taba1} is only available in electronic form at the CDSvia anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr ( or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/430/165}

Hipparcos red stars in the HpV_T2 and V I_C systems
For Hipparcos M, S, and C spectral type stars, we provide calibratedinstantaneous (epoch) Cousins V - I color indices using newly derivedHpV_T2 photometry. Three new sets of ground-based Cousins V I data havebeen obtained for more than 170 carbon and red M giants. These datasetsin combination with the published sources of V I photometry served toobtain the calibration curves linking Hipparcos/Tycho Hp-V_T2 with theCousins V - I index. In total, 321 carbon stars and 4464 M- and S-typestars have new V - I indices. The standard error of the mean V - I isabout 0.1 mag or better down to Hp~9 although it deteriorates rapidly atfainter magnitudes. These V - I indices can be used to verify thepublished Hipparcos V - I color indices. Thus, we have identified ahandful of new cases where, instead of the real target, a random fieldstar has been observed. A considerable fraction of the DMSA/C and DMSA/Vsolutions for red stars appear not to be warranted. Most likely suchspurious solutions may originate from usage of a heavily biased color inthe astrometric processing.Based on observations from the Hipparcos astrometric satellite operatedby the European Space Agency (ESA 1997).}\fnmsep\thanks{Table 7 is onlyavailable in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp tocdsarc.u-strasbg.fr ( or viahttp://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/397/997

New periodic variables from the Hipparcos epoch photometry
Two selection statistics are used to extract new candidate periodicvariables from the epoch photometry of the Hipparcos catalogue. Theprimary selection criterion is a signal-to-noise ratio. The dependenceof this statistic on the number of observations is calibrated usingabout 30000 randomly permuted Hipparcos data sets. A significance levelof 0.1 per cent is used to extract a first batch of candidate variables.The second criterion requires that the optimal frequency be unaffectedif the data are de-trended by low-order polynomials. We find 2675 newcandidate periodic variables, of which the majority (2082) are from theHipparcos`unsolved' variables. Potential problems with theinterpretation of the data (e.g. aliasing) are discussed.

Photometric and Ca II H and K Spectroscopic Variations in Nearby Sun-like Stars with Planets. III.
We present the results of an analysis of time-series photometry, Ca II Hand K spectrophotometry, and high-dispersion visible spectra of ninenearby Sun-like stars recently identified as having planets. For the sixstars whose presumed planets have orbital periods of less than 4 months(τ Boo, 51 Peg, υ And, ρ1 Cnc, ρ CrB, and70 Vir), sine-curve fits to the photometric data show no variations withsemiamplitude greater than 1 or 2 parts in 104. Photometricvariations in 47 UMa are similarly small, although our photometric dataof this star are slightly affected by variability of the comparisonstar. Nonvariability at this level of precision is sufficient to ruleout surface magnetic activity as the cause of the observedradial-velocity variations in these seven stars and makes nonradialpulsations unlikely as well. Thus, our photometry provides indirect butstrong support for true reflex motions-planets-in these seven stars, butcannot yet so support the planetary hypothesis for the two additionalstars, 16 Cyg B and Gl 411. Continued photometric monitoring of theshort-period systems may soon result in the direct detection of theseplanets in reflected light. We have used our photometric fluxes tosearch for possible transits of the extrasolar planets. Transitsdefinitely do not occur in τ Boo, 51 Peg, υ And, andρ1 Cnc, and probably do not occur in ρ CrB and 70Vir. Our transit-search results are inconclusive for 47 UMa, and wecannot address the issue for 16 Cyg B and Gl 411. The precision of ourphotometry is sufficient to detect transits of planets even if they arenot gas giants, as currently assumed, but much smaller objects withrocky compositions. The chance of finding at least one transit in thesix stars is ~40%. We find significant year-to-year photometricvariability only in τ Boo, which is not only the youngest star inthe sample but also the star with the shallowest convective zone. Theinterseasonal range in its yearly mean photometric flux is ~0.002 mag,roughly twice the 0.0008 mag decadal variation in the Sun's totalirradiance. Monitoring of the relative Ca II H and K fluxes beganbetween 1966 and 1968 for 51 Peg, τ Boo, ρ CrB, and Gl 411,between 1990 and 1993 for 47 UMa, 70 Vir, 16 Cyg B, andρ1 Cnc, and in 1996 for υ And. The data have beennewly recalibrated for improved long-term instrumental stability,resulting in better precision of the Ca II records. Five of the ninestars in this study have little or no detectable year-to-year variationin Ca II flux. The remaining four show moderate or pronouncedvariability: τ Boo, whose radial-velocity and photometric variationshave comparatively high amplitudes; Gl 411, whose planetary companionwas inferred astrometrically, not spectroscopically; ρ1Cnc, which may undergo decadal cyclic activity; and υ And, whichshows moderate year-to-year variability. Except for 47 UMa,intraseasonal variability consistent with rotation was detected in theCa II records of all stars. However, the rotation periods determined forυ And, 70 Vir, and 16 Cyg B are of low confidence. Anexamination of the recalibrated Ca II records for 51 Peg finds arotation period of 22 days, in contrast to our previous result of 37days. Ages have been estimated from the mean Ca II flux and, wherepossible, the rotation period. We find general consistency with the agesdetermined by others comparing properties determined fromhigh-resolution spectroscopy to evolutionary models, although theuncertainties are, in general, large. Based on observations made atMount Wilson Observatory, operated by the Mount Wilson Institute, underan agreement with the Carnegie Institution of Washington and theautomatic photoelectric telescope at Fairborn Observatory in thePatagonia Mountains of southern Arizona.

Stellar radii of M giants
We determine the stellar radii of the M giant stars in the Hipparcoscatalogue that have a parallax measured to better than 20% accuracy.This is done with the help of a relation between a visual surfacebrightness parameter and the Cousins (V - I) colour index, which wecalibrate with M giants with published angular diameters.The radii of(non-Mira) M giants increase from a median value of 50 R_Sun at spectraltype M0 III to 170 R_Sun at M7/8 III. Typical intermediate giant radiiare 65 R_Sun for M1/M2, 90 R_Sun for M3, 100 R_Sun for M4, 120 R_Sun forM5 and 150 R_Sun for M6. There is a large intrinsic spread for a givenspectral type. This variance in stellar radius increases with latertypes but in relative terms, it remains constant.We determineluminosities and, from evolutionary tracks, stellar masses for oursample stars. The M giants in the solar neighbourhood have masses in therange 0.8-4 M_Sun. For a given spectral type, there is a close relationbetween stellar radius and stellar mass. We also find a linear relationbetween the mass and radius of non-variable M giants. With increasingamplitude of variability we have larger stellar radii for a given mass.

Classification and Identification of IRAS Sources with Low-Resolution Spectra
IRAS low-resolution spectra were extracted for 11,224 IRAS sources.These spectra were classified into astrophysical classes, based on thepresence of emission and absorption features and on the shape of thecontinuum. Counterparts of these IRAS sources in existing optical andinfrared catalogs are identified, and their optical spectral types arelisted if they are known. The correlations between thephotospheric/optical and circumstellar/infrared classification arediscussed.

H-alpha measurements for cool giants
The H-alpha line in a cool star is usually an indication of theconditions in its chromosphere. I have collected H-alpha spectra of manynorthern G-M stars, which show how the strength and shape of the H-alphaline change with spectral type. These observations detect surprisinglittle variation in absoption-line depth (Rc approximately0.23 +/- 0.08), linewidth (FWHD approximately 1.44 +/- 0.22 A), orequivalent width (EW approximately 1.12 +/- 0.17 A) among G5-M5 IIIgiants. Lines in the more luminous stars tend to be broader and strongerby 30%-40% than in the Class III giants, while the H-alpha absorptiontends to weaken among the cooler M giants. Velocities of H-alpha andnearby photospheric lines are the same to within 1.4 +/- 4.4 km/s forthe whole group. To interpret these observations, I have calculatedH-alpha profiles, Ly-alpha strengths, and (C II) strengths for a seriesof model chromospheres representing a cool giant star like alpha Tau.Results are sensitive to the mass of the chromosphere, to chromospherictemperature, to clumping of the gas, and to the assumed physics of lineformation. The ubiquitous nature of H-alpha in cool giants and the greatdepth of observed lines argue that chromospheres of giants cover theirstellar disks uniformly and are homogeneous on a large scale. This isquite different from conditions on a small scale: To obtain a highenough electron density with the theoretical models, both to explain theexitation of hydrogen and possibly also to give the observed C IImultiplet ratios, the gas is probably clumped. The 6540-6580 A spectraof 240 stars are plotted in an Appendix, which identifies the date ofobservation and marks positions of strong telluric lines on eachspectrum. I assess the effects of telluric lines and estimates that thestrength of scattered light is approximately 5% of the continuum inthese spectra. I give the measurements of H-alpha as well as equivalentwidths of two prominent photospheric lines, Fe I lambda 6546 and Ca Ilambda 6572, which strengthen with advancing spectral type.

Vitesses radiales. Catalogue WEB: Wilson Evans Batten. Subtittle: Radial velocities: The Wilson-Evans-Batten catalogue.
We give a common version of the two catalogues of Mean Radial Velocitiesby Wilson (1963) and Evans (1978) to which we have added the catalogueof spectroscopic binary systems (Batten et al. 1989). For each star,when possible, we give: 1) an acronym to enter SIMBAD (Set ofIdentifications Measurements and Bibliography for Astronomical Data) ofthe CDS (Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg). 2) the numberHIC of the HIPPARCOS catalogue (Turon 1992). 3) the CCDM number(Catalogue des Composantes des etoiles Doubles et Multiples) byDommanget & Nys (1994). For the cluster stars, a precise study hasbeen done, on the identificator numbers. Numerous remarks point out theproblems we have had to deal with.

A new library of stellar optical spectra
Attention is given to a new digital optical stellar library consistingof spectra covering 3510-8930 R at 11-A resolution for 72 differentstellar types. These types extend over the spectral classes O-M andluminosity classes I-V. Most spectra are of solar metallicity stars butsome metal-rich and metal-poor spectra are included. This new library isquantitatively compared to two previously published libraries. It offersseveral advantages over them: it is photometrically well-calibratedindividually and consistently from star to star. Good temperature andluminosity coverage has been achieved. The incorporation of stars withwell-determined temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity parametersincreases the accuracy of the spectral type assigned to each compositelibrary star.

Asymptotic giant branch stars near the sun
Available red and near-infrared photometry and apparent motions of M, S,and C asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Bright Star Catalogueare tabulated and discussed. It is shown that the red and near infraredindices normally used for late-type stars are interchangeable except forcarbon stars. The M-type giants are variable with visual amplitudegreater than 0.05 mag. The reddening-free parameter m2 from Genevaphotometry is essentially a temperature parameter for M giants, whilethe reddening-free parameter d is a sensitive detector of blue stellarcompanions. The space density of AGB stars near the sun decreases by afactor of 35 in a temperature range 3800 to 3400 K. Two of the S starsnear the sun were found to have nearly equal space motions and may becomembers of the Arcturus group.

Secondary spectrophotometric standards
Energy distribution data on 238 secondary standard stars are presentedin the range 3200-7600 A with 50 A step. These stars are common to theCatalog of the Sternberg State Astronomical Institute and the FessenkovAstrophysical Institute. For these stars, the differences betweenspectral energy distribution data of the two catalogs do not exceed 5percent, while the mean internal accuracy of both catalogs data in thisrange are about 3.5 percent. For 99 stars energy distribution data inthe near infrared (6000-10,800 A) obtained at the Sternberg StateAstronomical Institute are also presented.

The correction in right ascension of 508 stars determinated with PMO photoelectric transit instrument.
Not Available

MK classification and photometry of stars used for time and latitude observations at Mizusawa and Washington
MK spectral classifications are given for 591 stars which are used fortime and latitude observations at Mizusawa and Washington. Theclassifications in the MK system were made by slit spectrograms ofdispersion 73 A/mm at H-gamma which were taken with the 91 cm reflectorat the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory. Photometric observations in UBV were made with the 1-meter reflector at the Flagstaff Station of U.S.Naval Observatory. The spectrum of HD 139216 was found to show a strongabsorption line of H-beta. The following new Am stars were found:HD9550, 25271, 32784, 57245, 71494, and 219109. The following new Apstars were found: HD6116, 143806, 166894, 185171, and 209260. The threestars, HD80492, 116204, and 211376, were found to show the emission inCaII H and K lines.

A list of MK standard stars
Not Available

The Perkins catalog of revised MK types for the cooler stars
A catalog is presented listing the spectral types of the G, K, M, and Sstars that have been classified at the Perkins Observatory in therevised MK system. Extensive comparisons have been made to ensureconsistency between the MK spectral types of stars in the Northern andSouthern Hemispheres. Different classification spectrograms have beengradually improved in spite of some inherent limitations. In thecatalog, the full subclasses used are the following: G0, G5, G8, K0, K1,K2, K3, K4, K5, M0, M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, M6, M7, and M8. Theirregularities are the price paid for keeping the general scheme of theoriginal Henry Draper classification.

1988 Revised MK Spectral Standards for Stars GO and Later
Not Available

ICCD speckle observations of binary stars. I - A survey for duplicity among the bright stars
A survey of a sample of 672 stars from the Yale Bright Star Catalog(Hoffleit, 1982) has been carried out using speckle interferometry onthe 3.6-cm Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in order to establish thebinary star frequency within the sample. This effort was motivated bythe need for a more observationally determined basis for predicting thefrequency of failure of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) fine-guidancesensors to achieve guide-star lock due to duplicity. This survey of 426dwarfs and 246 evolved stars yielded measurements of 52 newly discoveredbinaries and 60 previously known binary systems. It is shown that thefrequency of close visual binaries in the separation range 0.04-0.25arcsec is 11 percent, or nearly 3.5 times that previously known.

E. W. Fick Observatory stellar radial velocity measurements. I - 1976-1984
Stellar radial velocity observations made with the large vacuumhigh-dispersion photoelectric radial velocity spectrometer at FickObservatory are reported. This includes nearly 2000 late-type starsobserved during 585 nights. Gradual modifications to this instrumentover its first eight years of operation have reduced the observationalerror for high-quality dip observations to + or - 0.8 km/s.

1985 revised MK spectral standards : stars GO and later
Not Available

Catalogue of the energy distribution data in spectra of stars in the uniform spectrophotometric system.
Not Available

Carbon monoxide band intensities in M giants
The strength of CO (2.3 micron) bands was measured using the photometercomponent of the Kitt Peak 1.3-m telescope in an attempt to identifyextremely carbon-poor M giants. Magnitudes for about 200 bright M starswere obtained through a J filter, and narrow filters were centered on2.17 and 2.40 microns, respectively. No M giants were found with COindices indicative of extremely low carbon abundances. The correlationof CO index to effective temperature did not extend to the extremelylate and variable M giants. The dependence of CO index upon carbonabundance, 12-C/13-C ratio, surface gravity, effective temperature, andmicroturbulent velocity indices were also investigated. It is found thatthe predicted and observed CO indices are in good agreement for starswith spectroscopically determined carbon abundance.

Preliminary catalog of the declinations of 96 stars of the international program, compiled from Kitab PZT observations
Not Available

Revised MK Spectral Standard Stars Later than G0
Not Available

Star catalogs for the Washington and Richmond photographic zenith tubes.
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1973AJ.....78..642M&db_key=AST

UBV Photometry of 173 PZT Stars
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1971PASP...83..177W&db_key=AST

- and Broad-Band Photometry of Red Stars. Northern Giants
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1967ApJS...14..307E&db_key=AST

The Abundance of Lithium in Early M-Type Stars
Abstract image available at:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?1967ApJ...147..587M&db_key=AST

Contribution à l'étude spectrophotométrique des étoiles M
Not Available

The absolute magnitudes and parallaxes of 410 stars of type M.
Not Available

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Observation and Astrometry data

Constellation:Corona Borealis
Right ascension:15h35m15.00s
Apparent magnitude:5.11
Distance:175.131 parsecs
Proper motion RA:25.3
Proper motion Dec:7.8
B-T magnitude:7.281
V-T magnitude:5.322

Catalogs and designations:
Proper Names   (Edit)
Bayerμ CrB
Flamsteed6 CrB
HD 1989HD 139153
TYCHO-2 2000TYC 3053-2219-1
USNO-A2.0USNO-A2 1275-08698283
BSC 1991HR 5800
HIPHIP 76307

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